IRIRANGI Files

Here are a couple of pictures which might take a few of you back in time.  Double click on image to enlarge.  These pictures and a few more have been loaded up under the HMNZS IRIRANGI in the Gallery Section.   More to follow as time permits.

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12 Responses to IRIRANGI Files

  1. Jim Dell says:

    The photo of the RLPA (Rotatable Log Periodic Antenna) is at the transmitter site in 1983. The Receive RLPA at NR2 had already been installed. The first time the Transmit RLPA was used was to support a RN ship going back to UK from the Falklands. As she was travelling alone, her passage took her up the west coast of South America and then through the Panama Canal. Upon receiving the first transmission using the RLPA, the RS reported that the signal was ZBZ10 and bouncing off the bulkheads! Sometime in the late 80’s, another Tx and RX RLPAs were added to NT1 and NR2 aerial farms. These aerials made a huge difference to supporting ships at great distances from NZ.

  2. Jim Dell says:

    NT1 had three ex-submarine diesels (Fodens?) for supplying emergency power to the Transmitter building and they were named Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.
    The pic showing the camp and officers’ housing – Four houses were in Park Lane, which is above the rugby field (Thorne Park). I lived in No2, which is 2nd on the left. No1 is not visible through the trees. The house on its own below the playing field was the CO’s house.
    The Irirangi Sports Club was a great project and this pic shows a building about to be attached to the old QM’s Lobby. Many off-watch personnel helped out and the Club was used during the week and weekends.
    The aerial pic of the old camp – the building on the far left is the Senior Rates accommodation. I first went down to Irirangi as a RS and was billeted there with the late Al Tritt as my roomie – boy, could he snore!

    • John Bullock says:

      I wonder if the Foden diesels came from decommissioned Black Boats. I know the Mako (ZMCR P3551) had twin Fodens.

    • John Bullock says:

      The Melbourne Bar in Sembawang, the “lovely” bar girls called Al Tritt “the baby elephant”, otherwise “fluffy duck” to the rest of us!

    • John Bullock says:

      I remember relieving Al Tritt at NR2 for the day watch, however he was not there. As the story goes, he had to go to the Waiouru ATG Hospital because of two serious burn marks across his back-side, caused by nodding off in the receivers crypto office with his rear end pressed against a 2-bar electric wall heater!

  3. Jim Dell says:

    In the early 70’s the SCO was Tug Wilson, Chief was John Paull, and the RS’s were Al Tritt, Doc Watts, Tony Locke and myself (I had relieved John Bullock). I think there was a fifth RS but I can’t recall his name. At one stage, four of the POs were the ones that were on the same Advanced Radio Course – myself, Tony Locke, Gary Johnston and Greg Hartley.

  4. Peter Smith says:

    The picture of the emergency diesel power plant described as Mama Bear et al were not ex-submarine diesels, which drove generators, not alternators. . The authenticity of the Irirangi installation is endorsed by their designer/installer Cdr Jack Williamson who described the process in his oral history. “Two of the 40-ton diesels and their associated alternators and switch gear were obtained from completed hydro electric power stations around the country and a third [smaller] one was located in the pumping tunnel at Mangakino which was close to completion.”
    On a completely separate subject, Photo 63 must have been post 1952 as the CO’s house had been built.

  5. Jim Dell says:

    Photo 63 was taken after 1980. With the exception of the Irirangi Sports Club building, the other buildings in the photo had been given to Stu Sinclair. The old Senior Rates Accommodation became shearers’ quarters. (Bottom left)

  6. Dave Synnott says:

    Where are all the pictures of the Caves and their inhabitants?

  7. Jim Dell says:

    Just remembered who the fith RS was – Pat (Fish) Haddock

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